Why Dogs Are Man's Best Friend: The Truth May Surprise You

We all know that the relationship with our dogs is extra special. A dog is a man's best friend and dogs are the best therapy that any man can get. This bond we have shared with our canines goes back thousands and thousands of years. And for many of these years, researchers have been trying to figure out the human-dog connection in a variety of different ways. The truth behind dogs being man’s best friend will surprise you:

Wolf Pack

You may have known that dogs descended from wolves. In fact, its recent enough to say that biologically and socially, dogs and wolves carry the same parallels within their ‘packs.” The parallels include and are not limited to being territorial, hunting cooperatively. It also includes bonding with ‘family’ members and being excited when they are reunited.

We also see that the alpha male and female are sexually active even when other members are mature. Because of these parallels, we see that dogs and humans coexist naturally. You may notice that dogs get proper medical care, food, and sometimes sleep in their owners’ beds. They live these lives with their humans so well because they share that human-pet connection.

They’re a Member of the Family

Dogs are so attentive to the needs of their owners. They can predict what their owners are about to do, like walk into the house after being gone, prepping a meal, or going for walk and playtime. That is because dogs have a strong sense of body language.

They can direct where food or toys are being hidden, which goes beyond what any other household pet can do. Dogs are aware of the emotions of their human companions. They might express contrition if the owner is annoyed or lend a paw if the owner is sad. The emotions behind dogs make them valued as a family member to the human and vice versa.

The First Domestic Animal

Did you know that dogs were the first to be domesticated as a close association? Because dogs have been separated from wolves for around a hundred thousand years, we have been around, as a species (called Homo Sapiens), the same amount of time. This human-dog relationship is long-lasting.

Dogs have always been an alarm system, tracker, and hunting aid to humans. They are also providers of warmth and children’s guardians. In return, as humans, we provide our dogs food as well as security. This relationship for over 100,000 years is intensified as we have mutual domestication AKA we domesticated each other. Science is backed behind this human-dog connection.

Dogs are the best companions. As humans, we’ve relied on dogs to hear for danger coming. Our dogs have sniffed for prey as well. Because of this, we, as a species have seen a decline in sensory abilities. The regions of our brains did shrink. This is called the olfactory bulb and lateral geniculate body. In return, dogs’ brains have also shrunk by 20 percent. This is because dogs rely on us to do the thinking for them. This just goes to show how connected on a transactional basis humans and dogs can be. Next time you care for your dog remember that your dog is also caring for you. 

Why are dogs called man's best friend?

Domestic dogs have a long history of having close relations with humans. Dogs are special companions and they serve a wide range of roles compared to other domesticated animals. They're lifesavers, great companions and helpers, and devoted protectors.

Why are dogs the best house pet?

Dogs love you unconditionally and they fill you with a sense of emotional and physical wellbeing. They help combat loneliness and will make you a better person by teaching you a lot of things about responsibility, love, and compassion.

What are the best dogs for pet therapy?

Having any kind of dog is highly beneficial for our physical, mental, and emotional health. While all dog breeds can provide you with a sense of emotional well-being, certain breeds have the natural characteristics that make them suitable for therapy than the others. Some popular therapy dogs include the Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever, Pomeranian, Poodle, Greyhound, and the Pug.

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Written by Leo Roux

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