Joint Supplement for Dogs: How to Choose the Best One

Choosing a canine joint supplement for your fur baby doesn’t sound like too difficult of a task in theory. But when you learn about all the different aspects that you might want to consider before making a purchase, you may find that you are in a game of trial and error for some time. Going into the store informed may help shorten the time it takes for you to find good joint supplements for dogs. Dog arthritis supplements can be confusing and overwhelming to read and understand, so take some of the information below with you when you head to the pet store to purchase one for your dog. 

When Should I Begin Giving My Dog Joint Supplements?

First, you need to recognize which dogs need supplements for their joints before you decide when to begin to give them to your dog. For instance, large dogs, by nature, tend to need joint supplements earlier in their life than their smaller counterparts may. Take Great Danes for instance. They are so large and heavy; their joints take a lot of strain to them each day. With large dogs, you are thinking more along the lines of prevention than treatment. 

Senior age dogs, just like older humans, will really begin to feel their age catching up with them, especially in their joints. From years of running around the yard and playing fetch, senior dogs of any size will generally need some sort of joint supplement. Whether for support or management of arthritic joints

Any dog that has had a joint injury or was born with some sort of malformation of their joint would also benefit from receiving joint supplements. With any of these kinds of dogs listed, you will want to talk to their vet before running out and getting them a supplement for their joints. Their vet may even be able to recommend a brand that they know and trust.

What Ingredients Should I Look For?

With the number of ingredients that are generally listed on a bottle of any kind of supportive supplement, it's important to have a good idea of what these ingredients are, and which ones are most beneficial to your dog’s joints. 

Glucosamine and Chondroitin

These two ingredients are two of the more popular and beneficial ingredients that you will want to make sure are in the supplement that you choose to give to your dog. Glucosamine is a natural ingredient that works with your dog's body to help stimulate the growth of new cartilage. 

Chondroitin backs up glucosamine’s work by stopping chemicals that tend to destroy cartilage in the joints of dogs. These two ingredients make a super team that helps promote and protect the health of your dog’s joints. 

Omega-3

Omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial for your dog's health for several reasons. In terms of joint health. Omega-3 helps to support the digestion of glucosamine and chondroitin. Omega-3 can be found in many different fish products such as fish oil or salmon oil.

Check out our Wild Alaskan Salmon Oil. It's rich in Omega-3 and Omega 6 fatty acids from EPA and DHA, and can even help keep your dog's coat shiny. Omega-3 supports your dogs' cardiovascular health additionally. 

What to Do Before You Buy

Even though you are now equipped with the information from this article, there are a few more important steps you will need to take before running out the door to the pet store to get joint supplements. 

Talk with Your Dog’s Vet

Always discuss new supplements or drastic dietary changes that you want to implement with your dog, with their vet before doing anything. Your dog’s vet may want to warn you about any risks or reasons why you shouldn’t make certain changes. They may even be able to make recommendations for certain brands or products that you could use.

Be Realistic with Your Expectations

These supplements can certainly support your dog’s joints and help alleviate certain distresses or prevent joint breakdown. They cannot, however, cure or completely repair their joints. For instance, if you have a senior dog whose joints just don’t allow for them to run around and play as they used to when they were a puppy, don’t expect a joint supplement to return them to their physical capabilities of their youth. It’s unfortunate because we all would love to be able to turn back the clock for our dog’s physical health

Support Your Dog's Health in Other Ways

While your dog is still young and able, always allow them to take part in as much physical activity as possible. As counter-intuitive as it may sound to want them to run around and use their joints, good overall physical health is good for your dog’s joints. Not to mention, preventing obesity in your dog can certainly help to preserve the health of their joints. 

Conclusion

There is no single “best’ joint supplement for dogs, but there are ingredients that they will benefit from far more than others. The quality and potency of these ingredients can vary from one brand to the next, so it is crucial that you consult your dog’s vet about wanting to add a joint supplement to your dog’s diet. Most dogs can benefit from the addition of glucosamine and chondroitin to their diet, and their vet will likely be able to recommend a specific supplement that they believe works the best. 

What are the best joint supplements for dogs?

Glucosamine and chondroitin are two of the more highly recommended supplements that are used to support good joint health in your dogs. There are many supplements that include these two ingredients among many others that help to support good joint health in dogs.

Are joint supplements good for dogs?

If you purchase good quality joint supplements, they certainly are good for your dog. Generally, the ingredients in joint supplements for dogs are all-natural. Your dog’s vet can recommend one for your41120 dog that they feel confident about.

What vitamins are good for dog’s joints?

Different B vitamins have been proven to be beneficial for dog joint health. B vitamins generally contain antioxidants, which help to remove free radicals from the system. Free radicals are a contributing factor to aging and tissue breakdown over time.

Related Posts:


Related Posts


  • Types of Hound Dogs: What You Should Know About this Dog Group
    Types of Hound Dogs: What You Should Know About this Dog Group

    As the original hunting dog known to man, the hunting hound dogs have quite the reputation under their belts. The hound’s sense of smell and tracking abilities make it seem as though it was created specifically for the purpose of hunting...

  • Canine Distemper: What You Need to Know
    Canine Distemper: What You Need to Know

    Nobody ever wants to see their dog sick or go through any type of suffering. This is why most veterinarians urge dog owners to get their dogs the proper vaccinations to help protect them against commonly known diseases that have unfortun...

  • Dog Scooting: What You Need to Know
    Dog Scooting: What You Need to Know

    You are watching television in your living room like any typical night, and right before your eyes, you notice your dog acting strange. You soon realize your dog is scooting on the floor. Before you are horrified, please realize that mos...

  • Pet Fish Names: Unique Names to Give to Your New Pet Fish
    Pet Fish Names: Unique Names to Give to Your New Pet Fish

    There are thousands of good pet fish names out there to choose from. They can be incredibly creative like “Apollo” or “Harry Puffer”, or as simple as typical human names like “George” or “Kevin.” Here, you will find a unique and expansiv...

  • Dog Bite: What You Need to Know
    Dog Bite: What You Need to Know

    Nobody wants to be caught in a situation where you have an unpleasant encounter with a dog, but unfortunately, it can happen. In the U.S. alone, there are over 4.7 million dog bites every year. It is essential to know exactly what to do ...

  • Ferret Lifespan: Best Caretaking Practices for a Ferret Lifespan
    Ferret Lifespan: Best Caretaking Practices for a Ferret Lifespan

    Ferrets are a more common house pet than you may believe. Some studies have found that there are currently 5-6 million domestic ferrets sharing a home with humans presently. Much like with a pet dog or cat, there’s plenty to know about c...

Written by Leo Roux

Leave a comment